As they worked and reworked their first cities, the ground beneath them beganto grow as well — fat with last year’s earthen rubble, broken tools, and trash.Buildings disintegrated into layers of urban sediment, potch-marked with thefossils of keystones and ceramics. Cylinder seals tucked under a broken hilt,once fit to some smaller hand. Signed stoneware shards among the conduit.Assembled now on a stage of plywood and against backdrop of concrete: an excavation. A troupe come together of gypsum and foam. Through the dollopsof plaster seeping with pigment, such otherworldly ooze: the players reveal themselves. Old tools, artifacts, figures. Repurposed and refitted, their maker’sfirst plans long since turned dusk. All met, the scrim flown — the scene plays the strange familiar:A soliloquy atop the urban quarry, the reveal within its caves;Alien utensils made of our very verily human stuffs;The braggart, the dottore, the innamorati, the harlequin;Animal characters still present through the caked layers of plaster.Things from some time outside this one looking in. Curious about the sediment to come, eager to cast the new roles.Writing by Henry Fording Eddins
All Met is a solo exhibition featuring Chris Daharsh, at MCC-Longview Cultural Arts Center, running from 10/9/14 to 11/13/14.
Gallery open Tuesday 10-1pm, Wednesday 12-2pm, Thursday 10-1pm and by appointment
Chris Daharsh received his BFA from the Kansas City Art Institute and has since been making installation, sculpture, painting and photography that navigates his interests in material investigations, visual theater and themes of presentation and re-presentation with cultural artifacts. He’s shown work locally in Kansas City at City Ice Arts and La Esquina Gallery, at the Carengie Arts Center in Leavenworth, Kansas, the MDW Art Fair in Chicago and So What Space in Brooklyn. He was a resident at Charlotte Street’s Urban Culture Project Studio Residency from 2012-2014. Chris lives and works in Kansas City, Missouri.
Pictured Above:
Proto; 2014; Plaster, gypsum, dye, pigment and polystyrene; demensions variableReferent II; 2013; Solvent print on vinyl; 42 x 60” (Detail) High-res

As they worked and reworked their first cities, the ground beneath them began
to grow as well — fat with last year’s earthen rubble, broken tools, and trash.
Buildings disintegrated into layers of urban sediment, potch-marked with the
fossils of keystones and ceramics. Cylinder seals tucked under a broken hilt,
once fit to some smaller hand. Signed stoneware shards among the conduit.

Assembled now on a stage of plywood and against backdrop of concrete: an excavation. A troupe come together of gypsum and foam. Through the dollops
of plaster seeping with pigment, such otherworldly ooze: the players reveal 
themselves. Old tools, artifacts, figures. Repurposed and refitted, their maker’s
first plans long since turned dusk. 

All met, the scrim flown — the scene plays the strange familiar:
A soliloquy atop the urban quarry, the reveal within its caves;
Alien utensils made of our very verily human stuffs;
The braggart, the dottore, the innamorati, the harlequin;
Animal characters still present through the caked layers of plaster.

Things from some time outside this one looking in. Curious about the sediment to come, eager to cast the new roles.

Writing by Henry Fording Eddins

All Met is a solo exhibition featuring Chris Daharsh, at MCC-Longview Cultural Arts Center, running from 10/9/14 to 11/13/14.

Gallery open Tuesday 10-1pm, Wednesday 12-2pm, Thursday 10-1pm and by appointment

Chris Daharsh received his BFA from the Kansas City Art Institute and has since been making installation, sculpture, painting and photography that navigates his interests in material investigations, visual theater and themes of presentation and re-presentation with cultural artifacts. He’s shown work locally in Kansas City at City Ice Arts and La Esquina Gallery, at the Carengie Arts Center in Leavenworth, Kansas, the MDW Art Fair in Chicago and So What Space in Brooklyn. He was a resident at Charlotte Street’s Urban Culture Project Studio Residency from 2012-2014. Chris lives and works in Kansas City, Missouri.


Pictured Above:

Proto; 2014; Plaster, gypsum, dye, pigment and polystyrene; demensions variable
Referent II; 2013; Solvent print on vinyl; 42 x 60” (Detail)
The Palace At 4 AM

In 1933, Giacometti published a statement describing his artistic process, referring specifically to works like The Palace at 4 A.M. “For many years I have executed only sculptures that have presented themselves to my mind entirely completed. I have limited myself to reproducing them in space without changing anything, without asking myself what they could mean…. The attempts to which I have sometimes given way, of conscious realization of a picture or even a sculpture, have always failed.” This work with its spindly wood scaffolding, sheet of glass, and delicate skeletons is a vertical, immaterial drawing in space.

-Museum of Modern Art Publication Excerpt, 2006

This exhibition revisits Giacometti’s The Palace At 4 AM by showcasing works that, through various mediums and practices, attempt to engage drawing in space, interior and exterior experience and the historical tradition of a constructed world.  Each of these artists have shared with us a fragment of a larger whole: the physical model, double visioned images, abbreviated takes on the familiar, the authority and time of lens-based imagery, revisions of the grid, or the evidence taken directly from the studio as proof of an organized routine.  By drawing from these fragments and piecing them together, this exhibition is a contemporary reinvestment of Giacometti’s proposal.

Featuring work by Natalie Randall, Molly Dillon, Annabell Penelope Lee, Steven Zelnio, Scarlett Miller, Patricia Graham, Crista Siglin, Jon Bennet, Andrew Dwyer, and Andrew Lattner.

Curated by Corey Antis.

SunRise|SunSet: Work from Studio Nong

October 13th- November 7th, 2014

Opening Reception Friday October 17th 6-9pm | Gallery Talk Friday November 7th 12 noon

An exhibition of work created during the Studio Nong Residency 2013 | Guang Xi Provence, China.

With work by:

  • Jessie Fisher, Associate Professor in Painting, KCAI
  • Misty Gamble,Assistant Professor in Foundation Studies, KCAI
  • Scott Seebart, Lecturer in Painting, Drawing and Sculpture, KCAI and UMKC
  • Leandra Urrutia, Associate Professor in Art, MCA

In the summer of 2013, Jessie Fisher, Misty Gamble, Scott Seebart, and Leandra Urrutia worked for 6-weeks with NiXing clay on the top floor of a spacious pottery factory in QinZhou China along-side four professors from the GuangXi Arts Institute, Nanning, to create work that will be highlighted in the upcoming exhibition, SunRise|SunSet: Work from Studio Nong, which will be on view at the Memphis College of Art from October 13th-November7th, 2014. This collective, working under the title of Studio Nong, unveiled its first efforts at the QinZhou NiXing Pottery Museum at the Olympic Stadium in QinZhou, China in the summer of 2013. Now, Sunrise|Sunset, marks the first US exhibition of the work created by the American half of the collective.

In 2015, Studio Nong will come together for its second residency program at the Memphis College of Art and the Kansas City Art Institute to create a group of clay sculptures and works of calligraphy in conjunction with a lecture at the Memphis College of Art, workshops with RedStar Studios and the KCAI Asian Studies Department, and culminating in the presentation of the Key to the City by the Mayor of Kansas City, a KCAI Current Perspectives Lecture, and an exhibition and gallery talk at RedStar Studios / Belger CraneYard Clay that will focus on this growing international collaboration. 

Please join the artists for an opening reception Friday October 17th 6-9pm, and a gallery talk on Friday November 7th.

For more information about the Studio Nong Collective, its inaugural residency and the upcoming 2015 Studio Nong Residencies in Kansas City, please visit: STUDIO NONG 

For any additional questions, please contact Jessie Fisher, at jfisher@kcai.edu or Misty Gamble at mgamble@kcai.edu

Displaying Studio Nong Collective at their innuagural exhibition at the QinZhou NiXing Pottery Museum, QinZhou, China. Pictured L-R Shanwu Huang, Misty Gamble, Jigang Qin, Jessie Fisher, Scott Seebart, Zhenhai He, Leandra Urrutia,  Bangmin Nong.jpeg

Left to Right: Shanwu Huang, Misty Gamble, Jigang Qin, Jessie Fisher, Scott Seebart, Zhenhai He, Leandra Urrutia, Bangmin Nong


SHAWN POWELL CABIN FEVER

SEPTEMBER 2–NOVEMBER 23, 2014
RECEPTION SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 3:00–5:00 PM

State University of New York
Westchester Community College Fine Arts Gallery

September 2 – November 23
Mon – Sat 10am–3pm; Thu evenings 4–6 pm

 
Reception Saturday, September 20, 3:00 – 5:00 pm
 
For more information about this exhibition, please contact Matt Ferranto, Gallery Director, at 914.606.6621 or matt.ferranto@sunywcc.edu
 
Windows demarcate a penetrable boundary between inside and outside, between public and private, between accessible and inaccessible. But what happens during periods of literal or figurative confinement? At once barriers and portholes, windows acquire new meaning under these circumstances. Exploring the historical perception of paintings as metaphorical windows, artist Shawn Powell focuses on the experience of containment in his exhibition, Cabin Fever, on view at the State University of New York, Westchester Community College Fine Arts Gallery, from 
September 2nd through November 23rd, 2014.
 
Influenced by film and set design, Powell’s work typically features the common motifs of walls, landscapes – and windows. It’s through the latter that some of his most interesting work has been created. Composed of layers of alternating tape and paint, each finished piece in the exhibition offers up elements of freedom and confinement, of definition and ambiguity – by obstructing geometric and organic imagery with bold colorful lines or “blinds” that form a veil over the painted “window views.” Through a juxtaposition of distinction and blurring, the artist manages to emphasize points of tension, denying the viewer a complete range of vision.
 
“I want my work to be seductive, strange, and abrasive,” says Powell. And with that in mind, he’s willing to take risks during his artistic process. After spending hours composing his paintings, he then masks off the work with tape before applying additional layers of paint. “I never actually know what I’m going to get– a successful painting or a failure,” he adds. “I like this about the work. The painting spends time in a state of confinement, until I peel away the tape to reveal a finished image.”
 
The finished images, despite any unknown outcome on the artist’s part, succeed in one area consistently – conveying the experience of confinement through imagery that is both appealing and unnerving, simultaneously.
 
Attached Image:  Pink Moon, 15 x 10 inches, Acrylic on Sheetrock, 2014.
 
ABOUT THE ARTIST:
Shawn Powell was born in Saint Clair, Missouri. He earned a BFA at the Kansas City Art Institute and an MFA from Hunter College. Earlier this year his work was presented at Chapter NY in New York City.  His paintings have been exhibited at The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia, PA; Nina Freudenheim Gallery, Buffalo, NY; La Esquina, Kansas City, MO; Brooklyn Fireproof and Harbor, Brooklyn, NY; among many others.  He currently resides and works in Brooklyn, New York. 
 

STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK
WESTCHESTER COMMUNITY COLLEGE FINE ARTS GALLERY
ACADEMIC ARTS BUILDING 3RD FLOOR
75 GRASSLANDS ROAD VALHALLA NEW YORK 10595
MON–SAT 10am–3pm + THU 4–6pm
914.606.7867 | 914.606.6621
www.sunywcc.edu/gallery
High-res

SHAWN POWELL CABIN FEVER

SEPTEMBER 2–NOVEMBER 23, 2014

RECEPTION SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 3:00–5:00 PM

State University of New York

Westchester Community College Fine Arts Gallery

September 2 – November 23

Mon – Sat 10am–3pm; Thu evenings 4–6 pm

 

Reception Saturday, September 20, 3:00 – 5:00 pm

 

For more information about this exhibition, please contact 
Matt Ferranto, Gallery Director, at 
914.606.6621 or matt.ferranto@sunywcc.edu

 

Windows demarcate a penetrable boundary between inside and outside, between public and private, between accessible and inaccessible. But what happens during periods of literal or figurative confinement? At once barriers and portholes, windows acquire new meaning under these circumstances. Exploring the historical perception of paintings as metaphorical windows, artist Shawn Powell focuses on the experience of containment in his exhibition, Cabin Fever, on view at the State University of New York, Westchester Community College Fine Arts Gallery, from 
September 2nd through November 23rd, 2014.

 

Influenced by film and set design, Powell’s work typically features the common motifs of walls, landscapes – and windows. It’s through the latter that some of his most interesting work has been created. Composed of layers of alternating tape and paint, each finished piece in the exhibition offers up elements of freedom and confinement, of definition and ambiguity – by obstructing geometric and organic imagery with bold colorful lines or “blinds” that form a veil over the painted “window views.” Through a juxtaposition of distinction and blurring, the artist manages to emphasize points of tension, denying the viewer a complete range of vision.

 

“I want my work to be seductive, strange, and abrasive,” says Powell. And with that in mind, he’s willing to take risks during his artistic process. After spending hours composing his paintings, he then masks off the work with tape before applying additional layers of paint. “I never actually know what I’m going to get– a successful painting or a failure,” he adds. “I like this about the work. The painting spends time in a state of confinement, until I peel away the tape to reveal a finished image.”

 

The finished images, despite any unknown outcome on the artist’s part, succeed in one area consistently – conveying the experience of confinement through imagery that is both appealing and unnerving, simultaneously.

 

Attached Image:  Pink Moon, 15 x 10 inches, Acrylic on Sheetrock, 2014.

 

ABOUT THE ARTIST:

Shawn Powell was born in Saint Clair, Missouri. He earned a BFA at the Kansas City Art Institute and an MFA from Hunter College. Earlier this year his work was presented at Chapter NY in New York City.  His paintings have been exhibited at The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia, PA; Nina Freudenheim Gallery, Buffalo, NY; La Esquina, Kansas City, MO; Brooklyn Fireproof and Harbor, Brooklyn, NY; among many others.  He currently resides and works in Brooklyn, New York. 

 

STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK

WESTCHESTER COMMUNITY COLLEGE FINE ARTS GALLERY

ACADEMIC ARTS BUILDING 3RD FLOOR

75 GRASSLANDS ROAD VALHALLA NEW YORK 10595

MON–SAT 10am–3pm + THU 4–6pm

914.606.7867 | 914.606.6621

www.sunywcc.edu/gallery

Lester Goldman Award Exhibition

The Lester Goldman Award Exhibiton ran from September 8th to September 21st in the Dodge Painting Gallery. Winners and Finalists of the 9th annual Lester Goldman Comptetition will also take part in the upcoming traveling exhibition Disegno 7: Contemporary Undergraduate Drawing, alongside winners and finalists from the California College of Art (CCA) and the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA).

Featured Above are works by Julianna Lynn (1st Place), Miranda Clark (2nd Place), Jake Overstreet (3rd Place), Amy Erickson (Honorable Mention), Edward Fujiki (Honorable Mention), and Christian Velasquez (Honorable Mention).

Dear Kansas City Art Institute community,
Devon Schiller, a December 2013 graduate in art history and painting, Warwick Scholar, and Gilman International Scholarship recipient, will present his artwork The Filters We Live Through: Representing the Emotional Self in Digital Media in an Exhibit Session at the Tenth International Conference on the Arts In Society, to be held at Imperial College London, 22-24 July 2015
PRESENTATION DESCRIPTION: 
In an era of networked individualism, a prolificacy of online images necessitates of us a visual literacy.  In what way do the aesthetics of this virtual environment encode our development of emotion?  To what extent does cultural learning influence the social expression of these activity states?  How does digital media education empower us to act as agents rather than serve as vectors of cultural transmission?  
Postulating an analogy between photo-editing software (through which we frame, adjust, and share our representations of self) and emotional processes (with which we perceive, engage, and regulate our experience of self), Devon Schiller curates renditions of a kiss on the computer desktop that is his canvas.  Crafting a multimodal visual essay (screenshots and textual inquiry), he employs cultural analysis informed by the paradigm of cognitive science to investigate the reciprocity between the internal character of emotion (its biological causality, covert induction, and inwardly-directed aesthetic representation) and the external exhibition of these activation states (bodily posture, social valuation, and poetic expression).  
As neuroscientific discovery inspires educational practice, and artworks emigrate from cultural-heritage sites to hand-held screens, Mr. Schiller demonstrates how digital art may advance a critical awareness of emotion through how we document the affairs and affections of our daily lives.
BIOGRAPHY: 
A scholar artist, Devon Schiller holds a Bachelors of Fine Arts degree in art history and painting from the Kansas City Art Institute and is an alumna of the Studio Art Centers International in Florence, Italy. His research examines how digital media may promote inquiry in educational institutions and museums.  With his research process as an art historian complementing his studio practice as a digital painter, Mr. Schiller investigates in visual essays the process of identity construction and gender resolution, the socio-cultural consequence of categorization, and the ethical imperative of word choice. Composing a thesis and exploring a narrative at the intersection of visual and textual literacy, the computer desktop is his canvas. 
ABOUT THE CONFERENCE: 
The purpose of the Annual Arts Conference is to create an intellectual platform for the arts and arts practices, and to create an interdisciplinary conversation on the role of the arts in society.  It is intended as a place for critical engagement, examination and experimentation of ideas that connect the arts to their contexts in the world—on stage, in studios and theaters, in classrooms, in museums and galleries, not he streets and in communities.  "The Work of Art in the Age of Networked Society" is the special focus topic of the Tenth International Conference on the Arts in Society.
To learn more about this or other international Knowledge Communities and their respective programming, please go to:
For more information about  Devon Schiller, please visit:
Contact Devon Schiller at:  
Please join us in congratulating Painting Department Alum Ashley Wicks for receiving the MFA Faculty Exhibition Award at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts!
At the end of their first year in PAFA’s MFA program, Yoni Hamburger and Ashley Wick received the MFA Faculty Exhibition Award. This prestigious prize, awarded by the PAFA Graduate Faculty based on a student’s promise and vision, offers the graduate a rare opportunity to exhibit current work one year after graduation.
In Heads & Hearts, Wick and Hamburger explore the spaces between mind, heart, representation, and conception. As Hamburger observes his subjects, he attempts to penetrate the complexity of emotions that are often barricaded within the psyche. Wick enters the realm of Heads & Hearts by creating paintings and animations that trigger memories and desires.
Above (left): Yoni Hamburger, Jon Making Music (detail), 11 x 17”, oil on panel, 2014, image courtesy of the artist; (right) Ashley Wick, High Five, 16 x 20” (detail), oil on canvas, 2014, image courtesy of the artist. High-res

Please join us in congratulating Painting Department Alum Ashley Wicks for receiving the MFA Faculty Exhibition Award at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts!

At the end of their first year in PAFA’s MFA program, Yoni Hamburger and Ashley Wick received the MFA Faculty Exhibition Award. This prestigious prize, awarded by the PAFA Graduate Faculty based on a student’s promise and vision, offers the graduate a rare opportunity to exhibit current work one year after graduation.

In Heads & Hearts, Wick and Hamburger explore the spaces between mind, heart, representation, and conception. As Hamburger observes his subjects, he attempts to penetrate the complexity of emotions that are often barricaded within the psyche. Wick enters the realm of Heads & Hearts by creating paintings and animations that trigger memories and desires.

Above (left): Yoni Hamburger, Jon Making Music (detail), 11 x 17”, oil on panel, 2014, image courtesy of the artist; (right) Ashley Wick, High Five, 16 x 20” (detail), oil on canvas, 2014, image courtesy of the artist.

On Friday April 25th visiting artist and KCAI graduate (‘91), Angela Dufresne, met with sophomores Kevin Wilson, Patricia Graham, Braden Bandel, and Donnie Adams, for critiques, following her artist lecture having occurred the previous evening. Dufresne will also be speaking at the 2014 commencement ceremony on May 17th.